RSS/iTunes/Spotify

Following the worldwide success of El Topo and The Holy Mountain, Alejandro Jodorowsky connected with Michel Seydoux to pursue any project he wished. The answer? An adaptation of the beloved, expansive science fiction novel by Frank Herbert. What followed was an epic collaboration involving the director and a collection of legendary collaborators (or “spiritual warriors”) including Dan O’Bannon, Jean “Moebius” Girard, Chris Foss, H.R. Giger, Pink Floyd, Salvador Dali, Orson Welles, and that’s just the beginning! On this episode we look at how the project developed, how it fell apart, and whether it’s truly the greatest film never made. We also look at some of the criticism of the project, the adaptations of Dune that were to follow and – of course – the 2014 documentary JODOROWSKY’S DUNE that helped bring the story to the world.

Coming NEXT WEEK is a discussion with the director of JODOROWSKY’S DUNE Frank Pavich!

On this episode we refer to the essay JODOROWSKY’S DUNE DIDN’T GET MADE FOR A REASON… AND WE SHOULD ALL BE GRATEFUL FOR THAT by Emmet Asher-Perrin

Check that out here.

Your hosts are Cinema Smorgasbord regulars Doug Tilley (@Doug_Tilley) and Liam O’Donnell (@LiamRulz), but they are joined on this adventure by the always wonderful and incisive Julia Marchese!

Julia is a filmmaker, actor, writer, film programmer and podcaster. Julia’s first film was Out of Print, a documentary about the importance of revival cinema and 35mm to culture. The film has played all over the world in film archives, art house cinemas and universities. The 35mm print of the film is now housed at The Academy Film Archives. Her next project is a short film adaptation of Stephen King’s short story “I Know What You Need”. She is the co-host of Horror Movie Survival Guide, a weekly podcast that takes a deep dive into a different horror film each week, focusing on how to become the final girl. You can follow her on her social media platforms

juliamarchese.com

RSS/iTunes/Spotify

On this episode of We Do Our Own Stunts we’re continuing our look at the early career of Jackie Chan with the Jimmy Wang Yu-starring THE KILLER METEORS, which features the first collaboration between Jackie and Wang Yu (though their fates would entwine a few years later) as well as Jackie playing a VILLAIN! It’s a bizarre, and sometimes incomprehensible, high-flying martial arts epic, but it’s still a lot of fun. Let’s check it out!

RSS: http://www.cinemasmorgasbord.com/feed/podcast/
iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/ca/podcast/cinema-smorgasbord/id1495606055
Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/36GyQpY4P9HS87wmCKkGKY?si=wfj0g2auRlagZW2Aqx8ZJQ

Come follow us on Twitter or Facebook!

We continue our chronological look at the career of Carol Kane with the notorious 1976 flop HARRY AND WALTER GO TO NEW YORK! Despite a packed cast that includes Elliott Gould, James Caan, Diane Keaton and Michael Caine the film was a box office and critical bust. But does the vaudeville-tinged safecracking caper have anything to recommend it? Let’s find out!

 

 

 

RSS: http://www.cinemasmorgasbord.com/feed/podcast/
iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/ca/podcast/cinema-smorgasbord/id1495606055
Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/36GyQpY4P9HS87wmCKkGKY?si=wfj0g2auRlagZW2Aqx8ZJQ

Come follow us on Twitter or Facebook!

On this episode of WE DO OUR OWN STUNTS we’re taking a step back from Lo Wei’s attempts to launch Jackie Chan into superstardom and instead looking at the film that caught his attention in the first place: John Woo’s THE HAND OF DEATH! Not only does the film bring Jackie Chan together with the legendary director of THE KILLER and HARD BOILED, but it also features fellow Seven Little Fortunes alumni Sammo Hung (who was also the stunt co-ordinator), Yuen Baio and Yuen Wah! Check it out!

RSS: http://www.cinemasmorgasbord.com/feed/podcast/
iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/ca/podcast/cinema-smorgasbord/id1495606055
Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/36GyQpY4P9HS87wmCKkGKY?si=wfj0g2auRlagZW2Aqx8ZJQ

Come follow us on Twitter or Facebook!

Following the failure of NEW FIST OF FURY to launch the career of Jackie Chan, producer Lo Wei took another swing with the Chen Chi-Hwa-directed SHAOLIN WOODEN MEN from 1976. Featuring a story of revenge and intrigue, as well as the titular hallway of chain-operated wooden men, the film – thankfully – strays away from trying to recreate Bruce Lee’s persona and we get something closer to the Jackie Chan roles that would launch him to stardom. Closer… but not quite there. Check it out!

RSS: http://www.cinemasmorgasbord.com/feed/podcast/
iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/ca/podcast/cinema-smorgasbord/id1495606055
Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/36GyQpY4P9HS87wmCKkGKY?si=wfj0g2auRlagZW2Aqx8ZJQ

Come follow us on Twitter or Facebook!

Jackie Chan finally gets his shot at being the new Bruce Lee in Lo Wei’s direct sequel to his original martial arts masterpiece FIST OF FURY. But is the oft-quoted story about Chan’s failure at becoming a Chinese superman true, or is reality a bit more complex? On this episode of WE DO OUR OWN STUNTS we examine how the plot and purpose of NEW FIST OF FURY has been a bit misrepresented, a fact compounded by a 1980 re-edit that puts Jackie Chan front and center. Let’s check it out!